POSITIONING THE GAS CYLINDER

Ensure that the gas cylinder is not placed in contact or underneath the barbecue. The hose should be routed away from the barbecue without touching any hot surfaces. Ensure the cylinder is placed on a firm and level surface and that the hose is neither stretched nor twisted when connected. The cylinder must also be located to give good access to connect and disconnect the regulator, or to turn off in an emergency.

CONNECTING THE REGULATOR TO THE CYLINDER

Check that the hose is completely over the nozzle on the regulator and the nozzle on the Cooker and that it is secured firmly. The hose may be secured by a continuous circular hose clip or by the metal swaging process we use at our factory. ‘Jubilee’ clips must NOT be used as they don’t impart a perfectly circular pressure and can even push a section of hose away from contact with the nozzle. Remove the protective plastic plug from the cylinder outlet and save for replacement into the cylinder when empty.

 

Use the spanner provided to tighten the regulator to the propane cylinder in an ANTICLOCKWISE direction when viewed from the hose connection.

 

 

LIGHTING THE BARBECUE.

a) Turn BOTH control valves on the barbecue OFF, by turning them clockwise to a firm ‘stop’.

b) Turn the supply from the cylinder ON by turning the cylinder valve anticlockwise.

c) A LEAKAGE CHECK SHOULD BE CARRIED OUT NOW, IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY NAKED FLAME. Use a soapy water solution around ALL gas connections at BOTH ENDS of the barbecue and along the hose. Turn the gas OFF at the propane cylinder if the solution bubbles to indicate a leak

d) If no leaks are indicated, choose either of the two fireboxes and insert a lighted taper or gas match into the brass lighting hole (located centrally underneath the barbecue) and turn ON the control valve at that end of the barbecue by turning anticlockwise. The burner should light immediately and can be checked by looking through the 10mm diameter sighting hole in the side of the firebox.

e) If the burner doesn’t light immediately, turn OFF the control valve at the barbecue by turning clockwise to a firm ‘stop’ and try again after 5 minutes. If still unsuccessful, call an LPgas engineer or contact us for information or advice.

TURNING OFF THE BARBECUE First turn OFF the gas supply at the cylinder valve in a clockwise direction to a firm ‘stop’. Next, turn the control valves at both ends of the barbecue to the OFF position by turning them also clockwise to a firm ‘stop’. Detach the regulator from the gas cylinder if cooking has finished by unscrewing CLOCKWISE, when viewed from the hose connection and replace the protective plastic plug into the cylinder outlet. Wait for the barbecue to cool before moving.

CHANGING CYLINDERS CHANGING CYLINDERS MUST BE DONE WITH NO NAKED FLAME IN THE VICINITY. You MUST begin the sequence by first turning OFF the gas supply at the cylinder valve. Next, turn OFF both control valves at the barbecue BEFORE disconnecting the regulator from the gas cylinder.

EMPTY CYLINDERS MUST BE SITED WELL AWAY FROM THE BARBECUE IN A SECURED AND FLAME-FREE ENVIRONMENT, WITH THEIR PROTECTIVE PLASTIC PLUGS FIRMLY SCREWED IN POSITION.

TROUBLE SHOOTING

1) Extremely low flames which look like rows of peas are usually because the high pressure 1bar (1000mbar) regulator has been changed for a 37mbar low pressure unit. The ‘Output Pressure’ will be marked on the top of the regulator. We can supply an original replacement regulator, already swaged to high pressure hose at our factory, and ready with swivel nut connection to screw to the barbecue by a competent person.

2) Approximately half heat could be because the adjustable control knob on top of the regulator has been mistakenly unscrewed to increase flow. Propane regulators operate counter-intuitively and screw CLOCKWISE to allow more gas to flow. This information is printed on a yellow tag on the hose.

3) Uneven heat which is also associated with low power can usually be traced to a partially blocked injector or a burner which has not been cleaned and maintained annually. These are jobs for a qualified gas engineer, and a list can be found on our website.

4) Flare-ups are due to too much fat falling into the barbecue, never because of too high a gas heat. Check out the cooking demonstrations on our website and as an example try thinly sliced and tenderised steaks which are great for hot sandwiches with onions, or cut into strips over dressed salads. ‘Getting the best out of your Barbecue’ is also available on our website, which provides useful tips for commercial barbecuing.

IF EQUIPMENT IS FAULTY, DO NOT REPAIR IT! CONTACT US

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